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Charcoal Face Mask: Beware of Tutorials on the Web!

Charcoal Face Mask - Beware of Tutorials on the Web

You’ve probably heard about it or seen one of the many videos on the Web.

Here’s one of the fads of female YouTubers: a face mask made of charcoal and… glue.

You’re probably wondering what a tube of white glue has to do with a cosmetic recipe.

Imagine that I’m asking myself the same question and faced with the virality of the videos on the mask in question, I can only sound the alarm!

When a beauty tutorial turns into a catastrophe

According to the many beautician YouTubers who have tried it, the charcoal and glue mask would be the essential beauty gesture to get rid of blackheads and regain soft, luminous skin!

In front of the camera, they demonstrate it to us.

The recipe is rather simple: just mix white glue with powdered charcoal to obtain a fairly thick homogeneous paste.

The only thing to do next is to apply this black mixture with a brush, then let it dry for about 30 minutes.

Once the mask has formed a layer, it has to be removed… and it is at this very moment that the beauty treatment turns into a drama!

On the many videos that have gone viral, we are witnessing a real disaster scenario: the YouTubers cannot remove the mask, because it literally sticks to the face.

This is followed by a fit of tears, panic, redness, swelling, allergic reactions, irritation and burns…

But it must be said that the mask has fulfilled its purpose: the film has removed the damn blackheads on its way (a bit more, and it’s the skin that would have gone off with it)!

A dangerous beauty ritual, to say the least

If this mask is to be avoided at all costs, it is only the white glue that is pointed at by dermatologists, because there is nothing wrong with using charcoal to cleanse the skin.

Vegetable Activated Charcoal is a specific type of charcoal with a high absorption capacity.

It detoxifies the skin by capturing impurities such as dead skin, sebum or the famous unsightly blackheads.

It is a precious ingredient and it would be a pity to incriminate it: activated charcoal is not dangerous to health, but be careful to choose organic! In fact, non-organic activated charcoal can contain impurities which, depending on the ingredients and the production method, can cause problems when used on the skin.

White glue, on the other hand, contains solvents such as hydrocarbons or acetone, which are used in removers, products highly irritant and toxic to skin.

Highly volatile, these ingredients are harmful to your body.

In addition to the numerous skin reactions associated with the glue components, repeated use of this mask causes a stripping effect that destroys the surface layer of your epidermis.

And without this natural barrier, your skin can no longer prevent the penetration of bacteria and allergens.

Rashes and dry skin will be on the agenda.

I find these effects contradictory for a mask whose purpose is to care for the skin!

Instead, I suggest you try the recipe for this mask: it is simple, effective and preserves your skin.

  • Mix with a spoon or brush 1 teaspoon of activated charcoal, 1 tablespoon of aloe vera or honey and 1 teaspoon of water or hydrolat.
  • After obtaining a thick, homogeneous paste, apply your mask all over the face with a brush, avoiding the eye contour area.
  • Leave on for about ten minutes and rinse.

Moral of the story: maintain a critical approach

Don’t trust everything you can read or watch on the web, if in doubt check the information, find out before you test anything.

I don’t think I’m telling you anything new here, but some bloggers and female YouTubers, when they review products, don’t do it for free: they are sometimes mandated and paid by cosmetics manufacturers to promote their products, often without being aware of their composition.

A warning though, I don’t put all YouTubers and women bloggers in the same basket: I think some are trained and demonstrate a high level of ethics and professionalism, but on the Web, you can find anything and everything…

Caution is therefore advised.

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